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Refugee Women's Drum Circle

Refugee Artists in San Diego, June 2018

The Center for World Music celebrates the inaugural season of Songs and Stories: Refugee Artists in San Diego, a CWM project that bridges the distance between San Diego’s refugee population and the general the public through the performing arts.

San Diego County is known as a relocation hub for those fleeing persecution and violence. Over the past year, CWM project volunteers and staff worked with local refugee communities to identify performers and artistic leaders. We then facilitated opportunities for these artists to creatively interface with the public, allowing audiences to become immersed in the traditions, journeys, and voices of those finding refuge in San Diego. Through creative arts the CWM aimed to share refugee experiences and contributions, reduce the social distance between San Diego public and its refugee communities, and encourage support of refugee communities.

During the month of June 2018, 49 musicians performed in three locations across the City of San Diego. The events, which drew large and enthusiastic audiences, were hosted by the San Diego Public Library system.

The Songs and Stories series opened on June 6 with Voices of Hope from Africa at the San Diego Central Library  The event featured Matrida Boazi, the Revelation Gospel Band, and Emmanuel Adamson, with the discussion led by Delores Fisher, musician and San Diego State University lecturer.

Revelation Gospel BandRevelation Gospel BandRevelation Gospel BandVoices of Hope Crowd DancingMatrida and Revelation Gospel BandMatrida Dancing with AudienceVoices of Hope Discussion

Here’s a short video of the Voices of Hope concert.

The next event was Musicians of the Middle East on June 16 at the Logan Heights Branch Library. Featured were Fouad Sawa and the Al-Salam Ensemble, along with Dlan Dary. The discussion was led by Dr. Alex Khalil, neurocomputational ethnomusicologist and project scientist at the University of California, San Diego.

Iraqi Refugee Al Salam EnsembleIragi Refugee Musicians AudienceIragi Refugee Al Salam Ensemble with Natasha KozailySyrian Refugee Musician Dlan DarySyrian Refugee Musician Dlan Dary

See more of Musicians of the Middle East in this short video.

Culminating the series was Transformations Through Rhythm & Word on June 21 at the City Heights/Weingart Library and Performance Annex. The program featured storyteller Ari Honarvar, poet/songwriter Shadi Amini, and Shiffa: Refugee Women’s Drum Circle, lead by Dilkwaz Ahmed, Ari Honarvar, and Christine Stevens. The discussion was led by Vikas Srivastava, musician, author, and advocate of non-violence and social equity.

Refugee Storyteller Ari HonarvarRefugee Women's Drum CircleRefugee Women's Drum CircleRefugee Musicians ShadiRefugee Musicians Transformation DiscussionRefugee Women's Drum CircleRefugee Women's Drum Circle

KPBS aired a nice video on Transformations Through Rhythm & Word.

This project was made possible with support from California Humanities, a non-profit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in these programs do not necessarily represent those of California Humanities or the National Endowment for the Humanities.

This project was also made possible with matching funds from the Peacemakers Fund and through a partnership with the San Diego Public Library system.

Financial support was provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture.

The CWM expresses sincere thanks to the San Diego Refugee Forum, the International Rescue Committee, Musical Ambassadors of Peace, UpBeat Drum Circles, License to Freedom, and San Diego Newcomers Support & Development Programs.

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Mbira

September is Mbira Month

Celebrating Mbira Month

Mbira Month is a 30-day, global celebration of a Zimbabwean traditional musical instrument called the mbira. Mbira Month provides an international platform for celebrating and sharing traditional spiritual aspects of Zimbabwean Shona culture with all humanity. As both a musical instrument and a type of classical music, mbira is a “telephone to the spirits” associated with centuries-old cultural practices and religious beliefs. It is a vehicle for communicating deep human spirituality, both inside modern Zimbabwe and around the contemporary world.  The Center for World Music celebrates Mbira Month by sponsoring and coordinating a series of events in San Diego and in Japan—lessons, meditations, public concerts, informal presentations, and an informal get-together for mbira players in Southern California. See events here.

—Lewis Peterman, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus, School of Music and Dance, San Diego State University

Nomsa Burkhardt, Teaching the Traditional Music of the Zulu and Xhosa Peoples of South Africa

The Center for World Music would like to welcome back Nomsa Burkhardt to our family of outstanding teaching artists in residence, rejoining our World Music in the Schools program.

Update: Congratulations to Nomsa Burkhardt, Teaching Artist for the World Music in the Schools program, for winning a grant from Rising Arts Leaders San Diego to attend the Teaching Artist Institute.

Born in Soweto, Center for World Music distinguished teaching artist Nomsa Burkhardt is an extraordinary South African musician and dancer. She spent her formative years in KwaZulu, Natal, a region famous for its rich Zulu heritage and culture. There, she studied various traditional dance styles with master dancers, such as Indlamu, ukuQhobosha, and ukuSina. After immigrating to Philadelphia, she co-founded the African dance troupe HIMOSHA. Her artistic skills and passion for dance quickly propelled her into serving as both the director and lead choreographer for the troupe for seven years. She collaborated with well-known Philadelphia-based South African multi-instrumentalist and artist Mogauwane Mahloele at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Walt Whitman Cultural Arts Center, and at many universities and schools. She also performed and conducted workshops annually at the Philly Dance Africa Project. In 2000 she returned to South Africa to study with the accomplished ethnomusicologist Prof. Meki Nzewi at the University of Pretoria. Upon her return to the USA in 2004, she joined the Grammy-nominated South African band Sharon Katz & The Peace Train. As part of the Peace Train Project at the National Liberty Museum in Philadelphia, Nomsa was instrumental in developing a teacher-training program that focused on South African history and conducted a series of educational performances. Nomsa has toured throughout the USA, South Africa, Israel, Italy, and Germany. She is the co-founder of IZINDE, an Afro-fusion band composed of performing artists from around the world.


RALSD LogoUnder the sponsorship of the Center for World Music, Nomsa was selected in September 2017 to participate in the Teaching Artist Institute, a professional development program offered by Arts for Learning San Diego, an affiliate of Young Audiences/Arts for Learning. For a working musician who collaborates with schools as a teaching artist, this program is of tremendous value. Nomsa was awarded a Virgil Yalong matching grant from Rising Arts Leaders San Diego to support her participation in the Teaching Artist Institute.


 

Nomsa Burkhardt at Garfield Elementary

Nomsa Burkhardt at Garfield Elementary

Nomsa is a distinguished teaching artist for Center for World Music’s NEA-funded hands-on schools program. Her student-centered curriculum exceeds California arts standards by bringing joy and heartfelt fun into San Diego classrooms, while addressing core learning outcomes. Through the study of the traditional music and dance of South Africa, Nomsa’s classes focus on the importance of history and culture in the creation of music, the use of musical instruments, and the expression of community unity and collaboration through the performing arts. Students learn the geographical origins of musical instruments, increasing their global awareness and providing them with a global context to the music and dance of Zulu and Xhosa cultures. Nomsa integrates the science of making musical instruments in her program, and her students enjoy a diversity of music-making through singing and games that involve stories and simple songs, enhancing the connections to other disciplines such as literacy and math.

World Music in the Schools and the children of San Diego are fortunate to have Nomsa Burkhardt spreading joy and understanding through the traditional music and dance of South Africa.

Maluju – Stop Xenophobia By Nomsa

Video of Nomsa teaching South African Zulu Music and Dance

Garit Imhoff, Musician and Storyteller

The Center for World Music would like to recognize Garit Imhoff for his years of dedication as an outstanding teaching artist in residence for the World Music in the Schools program.

Garit in the Garden

Garit Imhoff is a professional mbira player, teacher, and all-around performer, specializing in storytelling and movement. He is a graduate of the California Institute of the Arts and has participated in world music ensembles for over forty-five years. He has studied and performed traditional Zimbabwean music extensively, both in the United States and in Zimbabwe, and has studied the traditional music, puppetry, and cultures of Java and Bali in Indonesia. Mr. Imhoff learned and practiced Zimbabwean music under the tutelage of many great teachers including Ephat Mujuru, Jacob Mafuleni, Stella Chiweshe, Tute Chigamba, Irene Chigamba, and Musekiwa Chingodza.  As one of its cofounders, Mr. Imhoff is an active performing member of Zimbeat, a professional San Diego-based music ensemble that specializes in the traditional and popular music of Zimbabwe.  He is also a performing member of Kembang Sunda, a San Diego-based traditional west Javanese gamelan orchestra.

Zimbabwe DayIn 2013 Mr. Imhoff was awarded a grant through the Artist Outreach Project of the Kenneth A. Picerne Foundation–funding to support teaching children in Encinitas at the Boys & Girls Club of San Dieguito. The Center for World Music partnered with the Picerne Foundation and Ticha Muzavazi, instrument builders and teacher of students with disabilities in Zimbabwe, to develop specially made small-sized Zimbabwean mbiras that could be easily played by young children. The resulting year-long project subsequently developed into Center for World Music classes in public and private primary schools throughout the County of San Diego.

Mbira Students

Combining storytelling, dance, and singing to engage his students, Mr. Imhoff has been using the small-sized mbiras to instruct San Diego K-12 children in the compelling traditions of Zimbabwe. His music classes in the schools are supported by grants from the California Arts Council, the National Endowment of the Arts, and the local San Diego community.

World Music Instrument: The Banjer, aka the Banjo

We continue our series of reports on the fascinating variety of world music instruments with an article by Curt Bouterse, Ph.D.

The banjo (its city name), or banjer (its traditional country name) is often thought of as a uniquely American musical instrument. And that is true, as far as it goes. But, like almost everything that wasn’t already here before the Europeans landed, its origins lie elsewhere. When Africans were brought to the New World as slaves, they brought the knowledge of a wide variety of instruments with a neck and a body covered with skin. While there were similar ancient instruments elsewhere in the world, it is clear that the African pattern, especially the akonting, from the area of Senegal and the Gambia—even its style of playing—was the inspiration for the evolution of the banjo. The most likely crucible for such development was the Caribbean: the earliest observers and extant examples come from there. One of the distinctive marks of the instrument was the short, high-pitched string played as an intermittent drone.

A painting, before 1790, is perhaps the earliest depiction of the instrument in the United States.

A painting, before 1790, is perhaps the earliest depiction of the instrument in the United States.

Early chroniclers in the United States included Thomas Jefferson, who characterized it as a distinctive instrument of the slaves in Virginia. Somewhere along the way European influences such as tuning pegs and a flat fingerboard were added. Probably for practical reasons, the usual gourd-bodied construction was superseded by a drum-like shell and transformed into its modern form; early 19th century instruments are clearly recognizable as the banjo as we now know it.

A genre painting by William Sidney Mount, 1856, showing its early modern form.

A genre painting by William Sidney Mount, 1856, showing the instrument in its early modern form.

Follow these links to see videos of musicians playing a modern gourd banjo & fiddle, the author playing a small gourd banjo of his own making, the akonting (the banjo’s most likely ancestor), and the ngoni, another West African instrument.

Curt Bouterse, Ph.D. is a member of the Center for World Music’s Advisory Board, and is a historical scholar, organologist, traditional musician, and instrument maker widely respected for his deep knowledge of Early and Medieval Music, World Music, and American Folk Music.

Mbira

World Music Instrument: The Karimba Mbira

We continue our series of reports on the fascinating variety of musical instruments that students in World Music in the Schools enjoy working with . . .

The mbira is a hand-held musical instrument that evolved in sub-Saharan Africa. In its many different forms, it is capable of producing both intimate singable melodies for meditation and vigorous percussive rhythms for dance. It can be used to delight and entertain, or it can be used to lend solemnity to religious ceremonies. Made from a small block of wood, with rows of tuned metal strips (lamellae) attached, the mbira naturally produces a subdued soft tone that can be amplified by placing it inside a large hollowed-out calabash gourd resonator (deze).

The mbira can be played as a solo instrument or as part of an ensemble, with other mbiras or with drums (ngoma) or rattle shakers (hosho). When two mbiras are played together, each renders a different but complimentary interlocking musical part (kushaura or kutsinhira). As a native-trained teaching artist, I currently teach a solo mbira type from Zimbabwe—the karimba—in the San Diego K-12 public schools.

Garit Imhoff, World Music in the Schools Teaching Artist

See the mbira in action on YouTube. Also, San Diego students playing the Zimbabwean karimba.

View Teaching Artist Garit Imhoff in performance with Zimbeat on YouTube.

Afro-Cuban Drums

How Santería Seeped Into Latin Music

As part of “Beat Week,” National Public Radio does a segment on the connection between Santeria and Cuban music . . .

The sacred and the secular have shared a place in Cuban music going back to the 19th century — and, in fact, sacred music with roots in west Africa informs a lot of Cuban popular music.

Read (better, listen) to the story at NPR.org.

Music of Zimbabwe, June 14, 2014

CHILDREN’S WORLD MUSIC CONCERT SERIES

Music of Zimbabwe

Saturday, June 14, 2014 • 11:00am – 1:00pm

Seaport Village, San Diego, CA

Financial support provided in part by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture

Seaport Village 2014 Flyer

SoCal Mbirathon, March 22, 2014

A SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA MBIRATHON

In commemoration of
Luken Kwari Pasipamire (1950-2010)
Saturday, March 22, 2014• 6:00 P.M.

1261 Windsor Rd. Cardiff, CA 92007

Mbirathon Flyer 2014

Events

Zimbeat

Zimbeat: Music of Zimbabwe

The 2015 SDSU-CWM World Music Series

Zimbeat: Music of Zimbabwe

Hypnotic interlocking melodies and spirited African rhythms culminate in the captivating and compelling music that is found in traditional and contemporary Zimbabwe.

Admission: $15 general/$12 students (advance purchase or at the door)

Cosponsored by the SDSU School of Music and Dance, Compassion for African Villages, and the Center for World Music. Financial support is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture.

Sene Africa

Sene Africa: Music of West Africa

The 2015 SDSU-CWM World Music Series

Sene Africa: Music of West Africa

Sene Africa is a duo from Senegal, Africa, consisting of Amadou Fall (kora) and Ibrahima Ba (guitar). The duo brings you an entertaining performance bound to bring happiness to the heart and soul. Ibrahima’s magical voice and special touch on the guitar, together with Amadou’s strong and positive presence on stage playing the kora, will make this a not-to-be-missed event!

Admission: $15 general/$12 students (advance purchase or at the door)

Cosponsored by the SDSU School of Music and Dance and the Center for World Music. Financial support is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture.

Zulu Drums

Music of South Africa

Children’s World Music Concert Series: Seaport Village 2014

Music of South Africa

The Center for World Music celebrates “Music of South Africa” in a summer children’s concert at Seaport Village.  Admission is free; bring friends, family, and especially children.

Financial support provided in part by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture.

Seaport Village 2014 Flyer

Mbira

Mbira Workshop with Garit Imhoff

As part of the 2015 Harmony and Motion Festival, Center for World Music teaching artist Garit Imhoff will be conducting a free karimba mbira workshop.  The mbira is the “thumb piano” of Zimbabwe. Mbiras will be provided, so just bring your thumbs!

The workshop will be on the small lawn in front of Patio B,  adjacent to Casa del Prado Theatre.  See you there!

Financial support is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture.

Mbira Keys

Mbira Get-Together in Memory of Robert E. Brown

The Center for World Music presents a Zimbabwean mbira get-together in memory of the Center’s founder, Dr. Robert E. Brown, who passed away 10 years ago on November 29, 2005.

Admission for this special house concert is free. The venue will be a private home in San Diego. Please contact Lewis Peterman for event details.

Robert E Brown

Robert E. Brown in Central Java, nr. Mt. Merapi

Read Dr. Peterman’s tribute to Robert E. Brown.

Download an event flyer here. Financial support provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture.

 

 

Ladysmith Black Mambazo

Ladysmith Black Mambazo: Singing for Peace Around the World

Enjoy an evening filled with the sounds of South Africa from Grammy award-winning choral group Ladysmith Black Mambazo. Experience their rich culture in song and dance at the Belly Up in Solona Beach.

Tickets $33-$35.  Doors open at 6:30, show starts at 7:30.

Get flyer here.

Soweto Gospel Choir

Soweto Gospel Choir in San Diego

Celebrate the season of giving with the inspirational power of South African gospel music.

Dazzling and unified. . . Soweto Gospel Choir was as much to look at as to listen to. The human spirit—this you couldn’t miss! —The Los Angeles Times

Matinee and Evening Shows!

December 20
4:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.
General Admission $25, Preferred Seating $40, VIP Seating $50

Tickets and further information at jacobspresents.com.

Soweto Gospel Choir at the Jacobs Center

Here’s a nice video on the National Public Radio website.

 

SD Commission for Arts and Culture


Sene Africa

Sene Africa: Music of West Africa

The 2016 SDSU-CWM World Music Series

Sene Africa: Music of West Africa

Sene Africa is a duo from Senegal, Africa, consisting of Amadou Fall (kora) and Ibrahima Ba (guitar). The duo brings you an entertaining performance bound to bring happiness to the heart and soul. Ibrahima’s magical voice and special touch on the guitar, together with Amadou’s strong and positive presence on stage playing the kora, will make this a not-to-be-missed event!

Admission: $15 general/$12 students (advance purchase or at the door)

Cosponsored by the SDSU School of Music and Dance and the Center for World Music.

Directions: SDSU Parking Map and Instructions.

 

SD Commission for Arts and Culture


Zimbeat

Zimbeat: Music of Zimbabwe

The 2016 SDSU-CWM World Music Series

Zimbeat: Music of Zimbabwe

Hypnotic interlocking melodies and spirited African rhythms culminate in the captivating and compelling music that is found in traditional and contemporary Zimbabwe.

Admission: $15 general/$12 students (advance purchase or at the door)

Cosponsored by the SDSU School of Music and Dance, Compassion for African Villages, and the Center for World Music.

Directions: SDSU Parking Map and Instructions


SD Commission for Arts and Culture

2016 CWM Summer Series: Music of Zimbabwe

The 2016 Center for World Music Summer Series at Seaport Village, East Plaza Gazebo

Zimbeat: Music of Zimbabwe

Featuring: Max Berry, Randy Griswold, and Garit Imhoff

Enjoy the dynamic village music of Southern Africa with Zimbeat. The music is based on the Shona peoples’ ancient musical instrument, the mbira dzavadzimu. Get carried away by the hypnotic interlocking melodies and spirited rhythms in the captivating and compelling instrumental music that is found in traditional and contemporary Zimbabwe.

Admission: Free

Directions: Park in the East Plaza parking lot accessible from Kettner Blvd. Headquarters and Seaport Map

Flyer: Download the 2016 CWM Summer Concert Series flyer.

Financial support provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture.

SD Commission for Arts and Culture

 

 

 

 

Photograph by Jolyne L. Harris