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Instruments of the Central Javanese Gamelan: An Introduction

This is the first in a series of articles exploring the various instruments of the Javanese gamelan. We start off with an overview of this fascinating topic.

If you were to travel to the islands of Java or Bali, you would very likely encounter the music of the gamelan, an ensemble of traditional instruments for which Indonesia is famous. There are numerous types of gamelan ensembles found across this diverse archipelago. Each has its own instrumentation, associated musical style, tuning, and cultural context. The Javanese gamelan tradition was cultivated in the palaces of Central Java as early as the second century CE. Because of its historical connection to the royal courts and their patronage, the music has developed into a highly refined art form and, like the classical music of Europe, has come to carry great cultural prestige.

The instruments of the Javanese gamelan ensemble at Canyon Crest Academy, San Diego. Photo by Laurel Grinnell-Wilson.

Most of the instruments of the gamelan are struck idiophones, a class of instruments that produce sound when the primary material of the instrument itself vibrates. They are made of hand-forged bronze, suspended on wooden frames. The gamelan ensemble can also include drums, stringed instruments, and wooden xylophones. All pieces of the ensemble are ornately decorated with hand-carved designs and shimmering gold paint.

The instruments of the gamelan can be divided into three families: balungan instruments, punctuating instruments, and elaborating instruments.

The balungan instruments—the saron, the demung, the peking, and the slenthem—carry the melodic lines. For these, players strike the instrument’s bronze bars with a mallet while dampening with their other hand to control the length of each note. Balungan in Indonesian means “skeleton,” which reveals a powerful perspective on how Indonesians perceive melody. A skeleton holds our body’s structure but is not seen from the outside. Similarly, a balungan melody should be strong but subtle. As with our bones, it should not be prominent. 

The ornately carved gong stand at the Kraton Yogyakarta (Royal Palace of Yogyakarta, Java, Indonesia). Photo by Laurel Grinnell-Wilson.

Unlike Western art music, which tends to be linear, gamelan music is cyclical, or colotomic. Colotomic time cycles are marked by the second family of instruments, the punctuating instruments. Most important in this family, and in the ensemble as a whole, is the largest gong, the gong ageng. It marks the beginning/ending of each cycle and is thought to hold the spirit of the gamelan, reflecting the strong mysticism that Javanese people still hold today. The gong ageng and the kempul, which are smaller gongs, are hung from wooden frames and struck in the center with a padded mallet.

The kenong, kethuk, and kempyang are sets of inverted pots that are supported by rope in wooden frames. All three instruments are played by one musician, who uses two mallets, one in each hand. The kendang, or drum, punctuates the time cycles and is considered the leader of the ensemble. Much like a conductor in a western orchestra, the kendang player navigates the musicians through tempo changes, starts and stops, and accentuates other collaborative art forms such as tari (dance) and wayang kulit (shadow puppets). All of the punctuating instruments help in marking time in the gong cycle.

The third family, the elaborating instruments, help add shape and movement to a piece, as well as anticipate where the balungan line is headed next. In so doing, these instruments—each following its own special rules of elaboration—play what is known as an “inner melody” to the balungan line. There are many elaborating instruments in the Javanese gamelan ensemble, including a two-string bowed fiddle called a rebab, a zither called a siter, a wooden xylophone called a gambang, a bronze metallophone called a gendèr, and a row of small bronze pots suspended over a wooden frame called a bonang. Vocalists are also included in this group. Each elaborating instrument follows its own special rules of ornamentation.

Central Javanese gamelan music uses two scales: pelog, which consists of seven notes, and slendro, which has five. The two scales are performed on separate sets of instruments, and gamelan ensembles may have one or both sets. There is no strictly prescribed tuning for either scale. The concept of laras, or how the scale should sound, was historically both subjective and protected, a choice based on aesthetic differences from village to village. This means that different gamelans using the “same” scale might have distinct root pitches, and the intervals between any two notes in the scale might vary, minutely or substantially, creating subtle differences in the mood or feeling of the music.

As in other elite musical traditions, the various instruments of the Central Javanese gamelan embody fascinating differences in construction, timbre, and performance methods. Learn more about the individual instruments as we add profiles of each in this ongoing series.

 

Laurel Grinnell-Wilson: Bringing Javanese Gamelan to San Diego Students

The Center for World Music is delighted to profile World Music in the Schools teaching artist Laurel Grinnell-Wilson.

Laurel in the gamelan room at SDSU

Originally from Northern California, Laurel has been an avid musician since childhood. After exploring the piano, flute, and violin, she started on the drum set when she was 15, playing in her first band with her brother, San Diego bassist Justin Grinnell.

Laurel graduated from Sonoma State University, earning her BA cum laude in jazz performance studies. While teaching and working freelance for several years, she discovered a passion for world music, bringing together her love of anthropology and her love of music. She went on to earn her M.A. in ethnomusicology with honors at San Diego State University.

Laurel and son Cedar with Pak Djoko Walujo and his wife, Ibu Endang

Laurel has studied Balinese, Sundanese, and Javanese gamelan, performing in Indonesia and throughout Southern California. Since 2007, she has been training intensively under the guidance of renowned gamelan composer, performer, and teacher Djoko Walujo Wimboprasetyo. Laurel has also studied West African drumming, Senegalese kora, as well as Zimbabwean mbira and marimba. With a deep interest in the ways in which cultural-linguistic context and music inform each other, she continues to broaden her expertise in ethnomusicology. 

Currently, Laurel is a lecturer and director of the Javanese gamelan ensemble at San Diego State University. In her role as a World Music in the Schools teaching artist, she serves as assistant director of Canyon Crest Academy’s Javanese gamelan ensemble, supporting the director, her mentor and CWM master teaching artist Pak Djoko. In addition, she continues to perform as a freelance jazz artist and as percussionist for musical theater productions and the San Diego Women’s Choir. She has appeared with artists such as Allison Adams Tucker, Lori Bell, Steph Johnson, and Monette Marino.

When she’s not performing or teaching music, Laurel is a mother to two children and an artisan soap maker

Here’s a short YouTube clip of Laurel playing bonang barung with the SDSU Javanese gamelan, accompanying dancer Casey Lee Sims:

— Contributor Evan Ludington is a student at Canyon Crest Academy and an intern for the Center for World Music.

Andrea Hernandez — Balinese Gamelan Angklung

The Center for World Music would like to give a warm welcome to Andrea Hernandez, who has recently joined our World Music in the Schools roster of teaching artists in residence.

Andrea Hernandez

Andrea’s vibrant creativity comes from growing up in a large family of singers, musicians, dancers, writers, and artists. Her imaginative home life inspired her to actively pursue all of these arts from a very young age. She grew up drawing, painting, writing, singing, dancing, and playing every instrument she could get her hands on. She has performed Balet Folclórico (traditional dance of all regions of Mexico) since she could first walk, and continues to do so to this day. Her insatiable curiosity and appetite to learn has persisted, as she continues to study many different arts including guitar, piano, drums, flamenco, and capoeira. When she first heard the Indonesian gamelan, she was naturally drawn to it because of its complex musical rhythms.

Andrea was introduced to gamelan while working at the Museum School in 2003 and has been in love with it ever since. She has studied and performed with many teachers including Dr. Alex Khalil, Putu Hiranmayena, Tyler Yamin, Djoko Walujo, and Made Lasmawan. Her primary focus has been Balinese gamelan angklung, but she has also studied Javanese gamelan, gender, and Indonesian dance under Wuri Wimboprasetyo.

Andrea is a member of the USD Gamelan Ensemble, Gunung Mas, and performs with them on a regular basis. At USD, her enthusiasm for learning and playing is almost unmatched and her participation is very much appreciated. She has taught beginning and intermediate gamelan angklung at the Museum School for about 10 years. Andrea is determined to continue developing her abilities and teaching skills so she can help her students find the inspiration to be creative in their daily lives.

Hirotaka Inuzuka

The Center Welcomes Gamelan Artist Hirotaka Inuzuka to World Music in the Schools

We extend a warm welcome to Hirotaka Inuzuka, who joins World Music in the Schools as a teaching artist. Hirotaka will be Balinese gamelan instructor at the San Diego French American school, beginning this fall.

A specialist in Indonesian gamelan music, Hirotaka began playing Balinese gamelan during his undergraduate studies in Ethnomusicology at UCLA. He continued to deepen his knowledge of Indonesian music and dance at California Institute of the Arts under the mentorship of I Nyoman Wenten, where he earned his MFA in World Music Performance. He continues to travel to Bali regularly to expand his expertise and study with Bali’s most renowned artists and teachers.

Currently Hirotaka is a prominent member of many gamelan groups in the greater Los Angeles area, such as Burat Wangi, Pandan Arum, and Bhuwana Kumala. He has performed in the United States, Japan, and Bali, participating in events such as the Bali Arts Festival and Bali Mandara Mahalango. In October of 2014, he played as part of Performing Indonesia at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C. Hirotaka has taught gamelan privately, as well as at workshops and community classes in Southern California, including the “Music of Bali” series at Art Share LA in 2014 and at Glendale Community College in 2015. In 2014, he established Sekaa Gambuh Los Angeles, a group dedicated to play the music of Gambuh dance drama. Facing extinction due to Bali’s modernization, Gambuh is one of the oldest surviving Balinese dance forms.

With his focus on teaching and performing gamelan music, Hirotaka has opened his own community gamelan studio in Tujunga, California, where he teaches and trains new players in order to further the preservation and performance of gamelan music in North America.

See Hirotaka Inuzuka on YouTube: Interview and Profile | Hirotaka’s YouTube Home Page

Fond Farewell to Putu Hiranmayena

We are pleased to share that Putu Hiranmayena, Balinese gamelan musician and much loved teaching artist for the Center for World Music, will be pursuing a Ph.D. at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in Ethnomusicology in the fall of 2015.

To help bid Putu a happy journey we asked Phil Beaumont, Director of the Museum School and David Harnish, Ph.D., Chair and Professor, Music Department, University of San Diego, to write a few words on their experiences working with Putu.

When one walks into the classroom, whether young or old, one can immediately feel the essence of Putu’s passion for Balinese gamelan and, in particular, teaching it to children. HIs smile is contagious, and sets a tone for our students to learn to love the intricate music they play. Putu understands that music is meant to be enjoyed and to be a part of who we are. After teaching students the many possible variations of a piece, he allows them to take ownership as a group and develop their own arrangements for performance. In doing so, he has captured them as musicians, and they can then capture their audience. A true gift.

— Phil Beaumont, Director of the Museum School

 

For me, I Putu Adi Tangkas Hiranmayena just showed up. I had no idea that other parties (e.g., Alex Khalil, The Museum School, the CWM, and his father [I Made Lasmawan]) had played a part in bringing him to San Diego. Putu contacted me out of the blue, told me he was the son of Pak Lasmawan (a good friend), and volunteered to join the USD Gamelan Ensemble, which I had just started the previous year. What a stroke of luck! Putu had not done a lot of work directing ensembles before coming to San Diego, but he was a skilled musician and drummer and knew a number of tunes. I immediately arranged a stipend for him, and later asked that he direct our gamelan (Balinese gamelan angklung), which he did for two years.

I saw him blossom into a fine and dynamic director, adding his own innovative ideas here and there to the repertoire. He communicated well with our students and got everyone excited about playing as he increased the tempo. He also demanded that students play with precision. We at USD will really miss him and I will personally miss him a lot, but I am very proud of his accomplishments and know he will be in good hands at University of Illinois, where he will team with I Ketut Gede Asnawa and the ethnomusicology faculty. His ideas of metal and gamelan and contemporary music may come further to fruition. Hopefully, we will all see him again some day back in San Diego. I intend to visit him in Bali as well and to meet him at ethnomusicological conferences.

— David Harnish, Ph.D., Chair and Professor, Music Department, University of San Diego

 

putuhiranmeyaWe always knew Putu would one day continue his formal education in ethnomusicology and experimental arts academia. The Center for World Music bids him the best in all of his future endeavors, and thanks him for his contributions to our musical and cultural efforts in San Diego.

While pursuing his Ph.D., Putu will continue work in Balinese gamelan, improvisation, and high adrenaline activities. This includes development of theories in embodiment and creative practices. He hopes to start a gamelan ensemble emphasizing real-time composition.

Cudamani

Study Music and Dance in Bali in July

The Çudamani community in Pengosekan, Bali, is offering a three-week Summer Institute in Balinese gamelan and dance, July 7-26, 2015. The village of Pengosekan, a traditional center of the arts, is just south of Uhttp://bit.ly/1bEDoidbud, at the cultural heart of the island.

Share three weeks of intensive learning with musicians, dancers, students, scholars and people from around the world who LOVE the arts. You will gain a new understanding of the richness of Balinese arts and be inspired by the powerful commitment to community that is at the core of Bali’s beautiful culture.

Teachers include several of the most renown artists in Bali. The programs of Çudamani (pronounced Soo-dah-MAH-nee) are widely respected.

For more information visit cudamani.org.

I Nyomen Wenten

USD Gamelan to Perform with I Nyoman Wenten, December 9

The USD Balinese Gamelan performs on Tuesday, December 9, 2014. The program will feature dance master I Nyoman Wenten, a long-time friend of the Center for World Music, as guest performer.

Enjoy the music of Bali, Indonesia at this concert performed by USD’s Balinese Gamelan Ensemble, named Gunung Mas (Mountain of Gold), directed by IPutu Hiranmayena and assisted by David Harnish, PhD. This concert will feature several special guests: Dancer I Nyoman Wenten and drummers I Wayan Budha and Tyler Yamin. The gamelan is an ensemble of metallophones, gong-chimes, cymbals and drums, and highlights energetic interlocking musical parts.

University of San Diego, Department of Music.

USD Gamelan Flyer

Bedaya Sapto

Bedaya Sapto, Courtly Dance in Yogyakarta

Bedhaya is the sacred classical dance of the courts of Yogyakarta and Suryakarta, Indonesia.  Bedhaya Sapta (or Bedaya Sapto) is unique kind of bedhaya dance, because it is performed by seven (sapta) dancers, instead of the usual nine.  It is not easy for anyone outside the inner circle of the various courts to be invited to witness a ritual bedhaya. Our friend from Bali, Made Wijaya, caught this performance on video while in Yogyakarta.

On YouTube:

 

CCA Wayang Kulit

50th Aniversary Celebration – Javanese Shadow Theater, May 10, 2013

Celebrating our 50th Anniversary with Canyon Crest Academy

A Javanese Wayang Kulit, Shadow-Puppet Play
featuring the Canyon Crest Academy Javanese Gamelan, with special guests From Los Angeles

Baghawan Ciptoning, dalang
Djoko Walujo, CCA gamelan director

Friday, May 10, 2013 • 12:00 noon

Canyon Crest Academy
5951 Village Center Loop Road
San Diego, CA 92130
Admission: Free

CCA Shadow Theater Flyer

Ade Suparman

NEA Visiting Artist Ade Suparman + $50K Grant to CWM

Good Morning San Diego, April 30, 2013

Indonesian visiting artist Ade Suparman appears on KUSI TV, celebrating the Center for World Music’s 50th Anniversary and a $50K grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Events

World Music at Mingei International Museum

The Center for World Music proudly announces its Spring 2022 concert season, “World Music at Mingei,” presenting an inaugural series of six performances at Mingei International Museum in Balboa Park. The series includes music and dance traditions, both classical and folk, that will introduce the audience to the sounds, aesthetics, and cultural significance of the music of select regions from around the world.

Ticket Packages

General Seating Package: SOLD OUT
VIP Seating Package: SOLD OUT

Individual Tickets

General Seating: $20
VIP Seating: $40

To purchase tickets to individual events, please visit the links below.

Mingei Members receive a 10% discount.

The ticket price includes admission to the performance and access to Mingei International Museum’s Gallery Level ($14 value) after 4 PM on the day of the performance. The Commons Level is free for all.

Please purchase your tickets early. These performances sell out well in advance. 

Proceeds support hands-on world music and dance programming for San Diego students in schools underserved by the arts.


Master of the Ghanaian Gyil: SK Kakraba
Friday, February 18, 2022, 7:30 PM

Let Your Spirit Soar: Afro-Cuban Music, Dance, and Culture with Omo Ache
Friday, March 18, 2022, 7:30 PM

Maqāmāt: Pathways to Beauty in Arab Music with the Al-Salam Ensemble
Friday, April 15, 2022, 7:30 PM


The Music and Dance of Bali: I Nyoman Wenten and Gamelan Burat Wangi
Friday, May 20, 2022, 7:30 PM

Flamenco with Lakshmi “La Chimi” Basile
Friday, June 17, 2022, 7:30 PM

Expressions of Joy: Festival Music and Dance of Korea with the San Diego Korean Pungmul Ensemble
Friday, July 8, 2022, 7:30 PM

Health and Safety

Proof of vaccination is required to attend these performances. Please bring a picture of your vaccine card or the card itself.

Masks are required indoors for all guests (ages 2+) regardless of vaccination status. For more information about visiting Mingei International Museum, please visit their website.


Co-Sponsor

Mingei Logo

Major Grant Sponsor

 

Financial support provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture.


Become a Sponsor

For details on sponsorship opportunities, please visit the Center for World Music’s 2022 World Music at Mingei Sponsorship Information.

 

The Music and Dance of Bali: I Nyoman Wenten and Gamelan Burat Wangi

I Nyoman Wenten with Gamelan Burat Wangi

The Music and Dance of Bali

With a career spanning five decades, I Nyoman Wenten is one of Bali’s most versatile master musicians and dancers. Along with his wife, choreographer and dancer Nanik Wenten, and his ensemble Gamelan Burat Wangi, he will lead us through an entrancing evening of gong orchestra and elaborately costumed dance. The gamelan’s shimmering rhythms of drum, metallophones, and gongs accompany a captivating dance drama based on a text from the ancient Hindu Ramayana.

Read more about I Nyoman Wenten.

Tickets

General Seating: $20 – SOLD OUT
VIP Seating: $40 – SOLD OUT

Mingei Members receive a 10% discount.

The ticket price includes admission to the performance and access to Mingei International Museum’s Gallery Level ($14 value) after 4 PM on the day of the performance. The Commons Level is free for all.

Please purchase your tickets early. These performances sell out well in advance. 

Proceeds support hands-on world music and dance programming for San Diego students in schools underserved by the arts.

Health and Safety

Proof of vaccination is required to attend these performances. Please bring a picture of your vaccine card or the card itself. Masks are required indoors for all guests (ages 2+) regardless of vaccination status.


Co-Sponsors Mingei Logo


Major Grant Sponsor

Financial support was provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture.


Become a Sponsor

For details on sponsorship opportunities, please visit the Center for World Music’s 2022 World Music at Mingei Sponsorship Information.

Canyon Crest Academy Javanese Gamelan Concert

Come and experience an outstanding concert of traditional Javanese music, featuring the gamelan ensemble of Canyon Crest Academy High School in Carmel Valley, accompanied by visiting musicians and singers from CalArts. They will perform a program of Javanese gamelan music, led by Center for World Music master teaching artist in residence Pak Djoko Walujo Wimboprasetyo. Admission to this event is free to the public!

Museum School Balinese Performance

Balinese Gamelan at the Museum of Photographic Arts

Center for World Music teaching artist Andrea Hernandez will lead her students in a colorful and dynamic performance of Balinese gamelan music at the Museum of Photographic Arts (MOPA), located in beautiful Balboa Park in the heart of San Diego. This exciting, free performance will be offered by students from the Museum School, which is located nearby in Bankers Hill, where students grades K–8 study this fascinating musical art form every week throughout the school year.

This performance will occur in conjunction with MOPA’s Reverberate: Sound + Image 13th Annual Juried Youth Exhibition, showcasing the photographic talents of youth in San Diego and Tijuana. This year students responded to the theme “Sound.” The exhibition highlights the students’ imaginative approaches to visualizing what we can hear but not always see. Admission to the museum exhibitions is on a “pay what you wish” basis.

SDSU Gamelan

Javanese Gamelan: Music and Dance of Java

The 2017 SDSU-CWM World Music Series

Javanese Gamelan: Music and Dance of Java

Featuring the SDSU Javanese Gamelan, directed by Pak Djoko Walujo, and classical Javanese dance.

Djoko Walujo Wimboprasetyo, musical director of the SDSU Javanese Gamelan, is an esteemed artist and renowned instructor of Javanese music. He studied gamelan from an early age with many well-known teachers, and later at the Indonesian Arts Institute, Yogyakarta. He was music professor at the Indonesian Arts Institute from 1975 until coming to CalArts in 1992. He has performed widely and composed award-winning music for dance and drama.

Admission: $10 college students • $15 seniors (62+), active military, SDSU affiliates • $20 general

Free Admission for elementary/middle school/high school students

Listen to the SDSU Javanese Gamelan on Soundcloud.

Cosponsored by the SDSU School of Music and Dance and the Center for World Music.

Directions: SDSU Parking Map and Instructions.

SD Commission for Arts and Culture

Asian Traditions at USD

Celebration of Asian Traditions

A celebration of music and dance from across Asia with some of the best practitioners of traditional arts in Southern California.

The program will feature kulintang and gangsa flat gong ensembles from the Samahan Filipino American Performing Arts & Education Center, the Ostrich Ensemble presenting Thai classical dance and music, Japanese shakuhachi played by Alex Khalil, Mongolian horsehead fiddle played by Charlotte D’Eveyln, Lao mouth organ played by Christopher Adler, and Balinese music and dance presented by USD’s own Gamelan Gunung Mas with special guest I Nyoman Wenten.

$10 general admission; $8 seniors, USD faculty, staff and alumni; and $5 for students with valid I.D. Purchase tickets at the door or online:

Purchase Tickets

Presented by the University of San Diego Music Department with the support of the USD Provost’s Office, the USD Asian Studies Program, the Center for World Music, and the Worldview Project.

SD Commission for Arts and Culture

Kembang Sunda

Kembang Sunda, Gamelan Orchestra of West Java

The ensemble Kembang Sunda will present a performance of Sundanese gamelan music on Friday, October 16.

Kembang Sunda is a San Diego based gamelan ensemble that performs traditional Sundanese music from West Java, Indonesia. They specialize in gamelan degung music, but have also been exploring gamelan salendro and kacapi suling repertoire. There mission is to entertain, educate and expose an international audience to the beauty and diversity of Sundanese music and culture. Directed by Amy Hacker, the ensemble has performed throughout Southern California since 2007.

Download a flyer here. See Kembang Sunda in action on YouTube.  And see you there!

Financial support provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture.

 

Music of the Balinese Shadow Theater

The Center for World Music is happy to sponsor a performance of Balinese music as part of the 2015 Taste of Asia event in Balboa Park. World Music in the Schools teaching artists Putu Hiranmayena and Alex Khalil will perform the music of the Balinese shadow puppet theater, or wayang kulit.

Taste of Asia is a two-day celebration of performance, crafts, and food. It starts at noon on Saturday, September 26 and ends on Sunday, September 27. The grand finale is a Moon Festival, boasting performances from China and fireworks, at the Organ Pavilion on Sunday evening.

Financial support for Music of the Balinese Shadow Theater is provided by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture.

Photograph by Alex Hanoko

Indonesian Sunset Recital at La Jolla Cove

Join us at the exquisite Pantai Inn in La Jolla for an intimate sunset recital of Javanese gamelan gadhon, a traditional chamber ensemble playing music of the Javanese royal court. The evening will include compositions curated by Tyler Yamin in tribute to a revered teacher of Javanese gamelan.

Light Indonesian hors d’oeuvres and a mixed tropical fruit coconut cocktail will be served during the reception starting at 4:30pm.

Admission to this special event is $30 per person. Proceeds will support world music education in schools across San Diego County.

Sorry Sold Out

Space is limited to 50 guests.  We’ll be outdoors, so please dress accordingly.

Parking Options

Parking is available on Coast Boulevard and on surrounding streets.

If you prefer, there’s an Ace Parking facility at 888 Prospect Avenue at the intersection of Jenner Street, about three blocks from the Pantai Inn, .2 miles away. Parking for the day is $10. Note: This lot will close at 7:00pm.

Another Ace Parking facility can be found at 1200 Prospect Avenue. It is .3 miles away, about a 6 minute walk and is open until 10:00pm. Parking fees will either be $10 or $15 depending on demand.

Financial support is provided, in part, by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture.

Photography by Alex Hanoko

Make Music Day San Diego

Join the inaugural event of Make Music Day San Diego in Balboa Park with Putu Hiranmayena performing on the Balinese gender wayang followed by a rare opportunity for you to play it yourself. The presentation sponsored by the Center for World Music will start at noon in the Plaza de Panama in front of the San Diego Museum of Art.

Check out the full schedule of Make Music Day events from 10AM to 6PM at http://www.makemusicsd.org/schedule/.

FUNDING FOR THIS PROGRAM PROVIDED TO THE CENTER FOR WORLD MUSIC BY THE CITY OF SAN DIEGO COMMISSION FOR ARTS AND CULTURE.